Weekly Twitter Wine Mini Reviews Round-Up For May 14, 2011

Vinted on May 14, 2011 binned in wine mini-reviews
  • 07 Dry Creek Vineyard Old Vine Zinfandel (Dry Creek Valley): The vines are old but their spicy dark juice has several yrs ahead of it $28 B+ #
  • 10 Crios Torrontes (Salta): Boom! Lychee shakes the room! Boom! Lychee shakes the room! Boom! Tick… Tick… Tick… BOOM! $15 B #
  • NV Bear Flag "Dark Red Wine Blend" (CA): Like Iron Man 2, the middle drags but the start & end are actually pretty damn entertaining. $9 B- #
  • NV Bear Flag "Bright White Wine Blend" (CA): The melons & limes are bright, all right, but they also come off way, way too cheerful. $9 C+ #
  • 08 Smith-Madrone Chardonnay (Napa Valley): Like ‘The Rock’ of Nap Chards; big, a bit obnoxious, but in its own way totally brilliant. $30 B+ #
  • 04 Torbreck RunRig (Barossa): For big Shiraz lovers, this is the hedonistic vinous equivalent of owning your own tropical island. $160 A #
  • 08 Chateau Tanuda Noble Baron Cabernet Sauvignon (Barossa): A commoner’s concentration, but w/ herbal minty action worth of nobility. $50 B+ #
  • 09 Hugel et Fils “HUGEL” Riesling (Alsace): Young, agreeable but has a caustic austere side. Best to let him settle down (for 3+ yrs). $24 B #

 

 

Taking A VinPass? (Social Gaming Goes Vino)

Vinted on May 13, 2011 binned in wine 2.0

Social gaming – driven in part by the ubiquity of social networks (do I really need to dredge up the if-facebook-was-a-country-it-would-make-your-country-look-like-chump-change stats?) and (I strongly suspect) our natural human competitive instincts now that hunting and killing are generally frowned-upon – has seen a usage curve that by any measure can be safely said to have exploded off the charts.

Here’s a real chump-change-making stat for you: Over fifty million people in the U.S. are playing along with social gaming – and that’s a stale stat from last year.

So it was only a matter of time, I suppose, before the gaming trend caught up to the world of wine, despite the world of wine being something like six years behind most every other on-line trend.

That feeling of inevitability was one of the major reasons why I decided to jump on the social gaming board with VinPass, billed as the first cross-platform social game for the wine industry, which launched just this week

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Can Terroir Be Designed? (Behind The Scenes With Chile’s Newest Ultra-Premium Red at Viña Vik)

Vinted on May 12, 2011 binned in elegant wines, on the road

“Of course, you know this word, terroir?”

The fact that Gonzague de Lambert, Marketing & Sales Manager of Viña Vik, didn’t punch me squarely in the head after my response to his question – especially given our close proximity at the time, he in the driver’s seat and I in the front passenger seat of a truck bouncing through the meticulously-kept vineyard property of one of Chile’s newest winemaking outfits – is strong testament to his good-natured attitude:

“Sure,” I said, “it’s French for Brett.”

Gonzague, formerly of Château de Sales, is very tall, very approachable, and (in mannerisms) very French (zee accent, zee pursing of zee lips when he speaks…).  All the more reason why my joke actually playing out successfully feels, in hindsight, like some minor miracle.

On a warm, sunny, South American Summer day in early March, I visited Viña Vik, hosted by Gonzague and their equally affable winemaker Cristián Vallejo. On a day like that, with full view of their estate (and upscale guest house) in Millahue, one marvels at what’s been achieved in their plantings, and in their lofty ambitions.  A state-of-the-art winery is being built there in the hopes of making the best wine in Chile.  As in, the best wine ever made in Chile.  No pressure or anything, right guys?

Viña Vik is the brainchild of uber-rich Norwegian entrepreneur Alexander Vik, who, after researching potential S. American vineyard sites with extensive soil reporting, settled his winemaking sights on this stretch of land in Millahue (“Place of Gold” in the native indigenous language there) on the northern end of the Apalta Valley in Chile. Carving out a viable vineyard here, in the middle of nowhere (if you were dropped into this hilly, arid, windy spot blindfolded, you could be forgiven for thinking you’d landed in an eastern Africa game preserve) must have put a serious dent in Vik’s fortunes.  They wouldn’t give me numbers, but did admit the cost to develop this land for viticulture fell somewhere in the ridiculously-expensive range.

The idea was to identify and develop a unique terroir in South America, and let the wine speak for itself.  But can the expression of terroir be designed? Can it bend to the whims and resources of an almost-unlimited wallet? In other words, did it work?  I tasted their blending components made from the unique vineyard parcels in 2010 – along with their latest 2009 release – to find out

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