Most People Will Never Get Into Wine – And Why That’s OK (The Launch of Crushd, And Analyzing The Wine Geek Pyramid at WBC11)

Vinted on August 3, 2011 binned in best of, going pro, wine bloggers conference

Chances are pretty high that, if you’re reading this (and you’re reading this), you are a wine geek.

And by “wine geek,” I mean that you are atop the U.S. wine consumer pyramid (that’s if you’re living in the U.S., of course – those of you outside the U.S. are just gonna have to play along on this one). As in, the tippy, tippy, holy-crap-it’s-a-looooong-way-down-from-here, tippy-top of the pyramid.

And it doesn’t even matter if you consider yourself an avid oenophile or not – simply by virtue of treating wine with any semblance of importance in your life, you’ve firmly entrenched yourself in wine-geek-out territory, at least when compared with the general consumer-going public in America.

And don’t worry about it…. because it’s okay.

In fact, I’m going to explain why that’s not only okay, but that you ought to revel in the fact that you are in the upper echelon of the wine-buying U.S. public. In fact, I’m going to explain why it’s downright awesome.  After a bit of exposition, of course.  C’mon, you think I’m gonna let this thing go under 1300 words?  Are you nuts?

It all came to me after day one of the 2011 Wine Bloggers Conference, during a steamy, 8-billion degree, 5000% humidity evening in downtown Charlottesville (I might have exaggerated that last bit), in which a bleary-eyed (due to travel-, conference-, weather-, and wine-induced-fatigue) yours truly took part in an off-premise “fireside chat” on the topic of Wine & Tech, which eventually turned about as heated as the sweltering northern Virginia night.

The event was organized by wine industry think-tank group Vintank and Crushd (the team behind a newly-released iPhone wine-journaling app). Thankfully (since most of us were already melting through our clothing) there was no actual fire was lit at the host venue (Orzo Kitchen & Wine Bar), and to assist (as if we needed it) getting our tongues wagging and opinions flowing, there were several interesting Rioja wines being poured courtesy of Vibrant Rioja (I can now attest personally to the tastiness of a well-chilled 2010 Marques de Caceres dry white Rioja on a stiflingly sultry Virginia Summer evening, by the way)…

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How I Fell Back In Love With Food-And-Wine Pairing (And Why The “Drink Whatever You Want” Mantra Might Be Wrong)

Vinted on August 2, 2011 binned in commentary

I fell back in love with food-and-wine pairing when I helped a friend (the irrepressible Tony “The Wine Chef” Lawrence) with an outdoor wine / cooking demo sponsored by the Pennsylvania regional chapter of the American Wine Society about two weeks ago (around the same time that the U.S. Congress was simultaneously “working” at raising both the debt ceiling limit and their own internal douchebag limit). 

I don’t feel like I talk a lot about food and wine matches on 1WineDude.com, but I’ve certainly contributed my share of recommendations, particularly around holiday times, primarily because people ask me and I feel bad not telling them something when I’m asked.  The trick, as the NYT’s Eric Asimov told me a couple of years ago, is to make the topic interesting and continually fresh – because readers do, in fact, want those recommendations.

But the food-matched-with-wine topic, generally, is tired. It’s tired because so many so-called rules proliferated in that space for so long, that the net effect seems to have been a general increase in how confusing wine is for the average Joe, a situation the wine industry needs like my daughter needs another plush dinosaur toy.

The most maddening thing about the pairing “rules” is this: of all the trained chefs that I know, none of them adhere to those rules. Not. One. Single. Chef.  So I think the wine consumer can be forgiven for a hearty round of “WTF?” on that one.  The flipside of this rule-breaking is the proliferation of the “drink whatever you like with your food, because your preferences are more important” school of advice.  And I’ve come to think that this advice – which I’ve given myself quite often – may, in fact, be wrong.

Why?  Because there are guidelines for food-and-wine pairing. And while they don’t trump the most steeped, stubborn, and obstinate of our personal tastes, they do in fact work for many, many people. Probably most people. The guidelines are based on your personal preferences, and are general enough to apply creatively without getting too specific.

And when done right, a food-and-wine pairing can elevate even some of the most pedestrian wines to surprising culinary heights…

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Weekly Twitter Wine Mini Reviews Round-Up For July 30, 2011

Vinted on July 30, 2011 binned in wine mini-reviews

Uhm, like what is this stuff?
I taste a bunch-o-wine (technical term for more than most people). So each week, I share some of my wine sample tasting notes via twitter (limited to 140 characters). They are meant to be fun, quickly-and-easily-digestible reviews. Below is a wrap-up of the twitter reviews from the past week (click here for the skinny on how to read them), along with links to help you find them so you can try them for yourself. Cheers!

  • 07 Trapiche Vina Adolfo Ahumada Malbec (Mendoza): Sooo much yummy black cherry, sandalwood & leathery complexity. But soooo much oak. $55 B+ >>find this wine>>
  • 10 Keswick Vineyards Verdejo (Monticello): Hey, who let that Spanish guy in here? Crisp, tropical, fruity – & very, very quaffable. $18 B >>find this wine>>
  • 08 Cooper Vineyards Norton (VA): Brambly meets savory, with a side of red berries & vanilla. The bad-ass anise brings it all home. $24 B >>find this wine>>
  • 10 Cooper Vineyards Viognier (VA): Full of peaches & limes, & asking you to run out & buy some VA crab cakes, which it craves dearly. $23 B >>find this wine>>
  • 09 First Colony Winery Chardonnay Reserve (Monticello): Cheaper than an aroma fault kit, with just about the same result. Avoid. $18 D >>find this wine>>
  • 09 First Colony Winery Petit Verdot (VA): Compelling case built for VA PV on this spice, graphite, dark fruit, tomato leaf & cranberry $24 B >>find this wine>>
  • 08 Jefferson Vineyards Meritage (VA): Methodical, pleasant & as structured (ok, & maybe as stiff, too) as the founding father himself. $29 B >>find this wine>>
  • 10 Jefferson Vineyards Viognier (VA): If you spent hours searching for the ripest honeysuckle flowers when U were a kid, then try this $24 B >>find this wine>>
  • 10 Chrysalis Vineyards Viognier (VA): Floral, classic & a testament to why VA is trying to hang their signature grape hat on Viognier $29 B+ >>find this wine>>
  • 08 Chrysalis Vineyards Norton Locksley Reserve (VA): Black licorice, cola; angular & strange, but w/ beauty like an abstract painting $35 B+ >>find this wine>>
  • 09 Emma Pearl Chardonnay (Central Coast): Vibrant & accessible style. So many cut flowers it’s like walking right into the flower shop $18 B >>find this wine>>
  • 07 Chateau Mukhrani Saperavi (Mukhrani): Classic Georgian (the republic, not the state!); stewed prunes, black pepper & fascination. $18 B >>find this wine>>
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