Weekly Twitter Wine Mini Reviews Round-Up For 2011-01-01

Vinted on January 1, 2011 binned in wine mini-reviews
  • 08 Selbach "Fish Label" Riesling Kabinett (Mosel): Will rock the leftover holiday turkey sandwich. Xtra pts 4 the white flower action. $16 B #
  • 08 C. Donatiello Middle Reach Pinot Noir (Russian River Valley): Full posse of spicy red fruits & berries riding on a sandalwood horse $34 B #
  • 06 Eifel-Pfeiffer Estate Collection Riesling Spatlese (Mosel): Honeysuckle, limes & good balance abound, riding ye olde petrol engine. $20 B #
  • 09 Afros Vinhão (Vinho Verde): Acquired taste (but tasty nonetheless) of dark, dark, and I mean DARK wild berries, spice & earth. €14 B- #
  • 06 Afros Sparkling Vinhão Reserve (Vinho Verde): Given 100 yrs 1 wouldn't guess something so dark would be so deliciously food-worthy. €19 B #
  • 09 Afros Loureiro (Vinho Verde): Like you just got personally invited to the Citrus & Tropical Fruit Ball (elegant dress included). €13 B+ #
  • 07 Afros Sparkling Loureiro Reserve (Vinho Verde): Brings the brioche, but left me yearning for a bit more Loureiro citrus magic. $NA B #
  • 07 Paraduxx Red (Napa Valley): Will cost you a pair of buxx, but will reward you with classic Zin dark fruit & gripping structure. $55 B+ #
  • Dow's Fine White Porto (Porto): It's magic in the art of blending; as in when you "blend" it in a glass with club soda, mint, & lime. $15 C+ #

 

 

Not Quite Readers’ Choice: Top Ten Articles of 2010

Vinted on December 30, 2010 binned in about 1winedude blog, best of

As New Year’s Eve approaches, we are greeted with the familiar sights of fireworks, the sounds of annoying Vuvuzela-like party favors, and the coming of cheesy year-end recap. posts!

So today, we’re not ranking wines, but articles. I had fun pulling together the 2009 recap. of the most-commented posts on 1WineDude.com, so I thought I’d do the same for 2010, using the totally unscientific method of listing all of the posts form the Archives page and ordering what looked like the ones with the most comments.

The rationale of course being that these are the posts that you, the extraordinarily talented, modest, and altogether too-good-looking 1WD readers felt were most worth the effort of contributing your time, passion and opinions.

As was the case last year, controversy (and Robert Parker – honestly… I’m starting to wonder if you folks are obsessed with RMP… you can probably seek help for that, you know…) won out.  I consider the majority of the topics covered in the round-up below (two were giveaways, which weren’t controversial but did turn into interesting discussions on how we take tasting notes, and our preferred methods for cork extractions) to be at least somewhat controversial in the wine world.  And then there’s what seems to be the holy triumvirate of wine controversy: namely, BioDynamic winemaking, The Wine Trials author Robin Goldstein, and uber-critic Robert Parker

Read the rest of this stuff »

9

 

 

Learning About Wine Writing the Easy Way (2011 Professional Wine Writers Symposium in Napa)

Vinted on December 29, 2010 binned in going pro, wine blogging

I’m kind of like a bad debt that you cannot pay.  I just keep coming back

And in February, the crime scene to which I’ll be returning is the lovely Meadowood in Napa Valley, where I’ll be a panelist at the 2011 Symposium for Professional Wine Writers. Some of you out there in blog-o-land might recall that I was lucky enough to receive a fellowship to the same event in 2010 and even luckier to take part as a panelist during the time I was there.

I remain, as ever, totally amazed at the gullibility generosity of those within the world of wine that they continue to ask me to take part in such wonderful events as the Symposium, and it’s my intention here to convince any of you who are budding wine writers to go to this shin-dig. Yes, it will cost you a few hundred bucks, but there exists no better event on offer with such concentrated wine and writing talent (excluding your truly, of course!) in the United States. It’s like wine writing crack, only more intense and very likely healthier for you, assuming you’re not actually taking crack while attending the Symposium.  And while it may not actually be easy, all things considered it’s a hell of a lot easier than trying to garner such collective wine-writing wisdom and experience by your lonesome self!

The WWS is also the place where you’ll get a chance to rub elbows with the likes of Antonia Allegra, Gerald Asher, Lettie Teague, Jack Hart and Dominique Browning – there’s some serious writing clout in the speakers list for this thing.  I’m honored and excited to be sharing the panelists’ table with Lettie and Doug Cook, but for the most part I’m gonna be in the bleacher seats soaking in all of the good stuff, just like everybody else. And taking a copious amount of notes.

So… if you’re based in the U.S. and are at all interested in seriously applying the craft of writing to the world of wine, then I sincerely hope to meet you there!

Cheers!

12

 

 

The Fine Print

This site is licensed under Creative Commons. Content may be used for non-commercial use only; no modifications allowed; attribution required in the form of a statement "originally published by 1WineDude" with a link back to the original posting.

Play nice! Code of Ethics and Privacy.

Contact: joe (at) 1winedude (dot) com

Google+

Labels

Vintage

Find

An abundance of free academic writing tips is waiting for you. An expert writer will share helpful research and writing guides with college students.