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1WineDude | A Serious Wine Blog for the Not-So-Serious Drinker - Page 274

Why You Need to be a Wine Twit

Vinted on September 10, 2009 binned in commentary, twitter, wine 2.0
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HiYa! If you're new here, you may want to Sign Up to get all the latest wine coolness delivered to your virtual doorstep. I've also got short, easily-digestible mini wine reviews and some educational, entertaining wine vids. If you're looking to up your wine tasting IQ, check out my book How to Taste Like a Wine Geek: A practical guide to tasting, enjoying, and learning about the world's greatest beverage. Cheers!

Remember Internet chat rooms?  Sure you do – those were the simple, on-line places where you could converse, via written text-based messages, with other seemingly like-minded folks about an endless array of topics, ranging from politics to puppy grooming.  Well, converse until the person on the other end asked “Are you a chick?  are you hot?”

Back in those days, I had two buddies who would frequent on-line chat rooms dedicated to topics about Wars, and strike up a group conversation.  Once they thought that they’d earned the trust of the folks chatting on-line, they would say something deliberately inflammatory like “all of the Star Wars books suck!” and start a short-lived but vicious flame-war, during which they would often change sides to try to confuse the poor people who jumped into the fray.  It was kind of like an all-out Star Wars chat room ballroom brawl.

Ah, the heady, youthful and poignantly ignorant days of the Internet!

Forums came next, but aren’t real-time, and in the on-line wine world the forums most closely associated with print media (eRobertParker.com and Winespectator.com) have been marred by the negative perceptions of hostility on the part of both members and moderators.

In these more recent days, the chat room and the on-line forum have been superseded.  We have seen the future of on-line wine chat, and it’s full of wine twits like me.

There is a place where wineries, media, bloggers, and wine lovers are congregating to chat about wine on-line, and it’s called twitter.  And if you love wine, you need to be part of this virtual community.

I’m not going to ‘explain’ twitter here.  Mostly because it’s very difficult to explain twitter, and I’m lazy.  Instead, I’m just going to try to convince you that if you’re not yet part of the wine community on twitter, then you need to be.

Fortunately for me, that’s actually pretty easy, because it pretty much boils down to one only reason (and even I can explain that one!)…

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Twitter Taste Live – Did Someone Say… Salta ?!?

Vinted on September 9, 2009 binned in twitter taste live

Let’s get this straight right off the bat: the amount of ass that is being kicked right now by Twitter Taste Live is borderline-staggering.  having been involved with TTL since its humble beginnings, it’s sometimes hard for me to conceive that TTL is barely over a year old, and it’s become the de facto on-line social wine experience.  And yet, that’s exactly what’s happened.  And that’s awesome.

Last week, Twitter Taste Live embarked on another new edition to their lineup of events, pairing up with Wines of Argentina to kick-off a month-long focus on Argentina’s wine regions, beginning with the extreme northerly area of Salta and including tweets from the winemakers based in the area (specifically bodegas Etchart, Colomé & Michel Torino, including Victor Marcantoni, Thibaud Delmotte & Alejandro Nesman).

When you’re checking out the wines of Salta, there are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Many of the vines are old, planted on non-grafted rootstock brought over from France during the phylloxera epidemic in Europe.
  • Many of those vines are planted at some of the highest elevations in the world (regularly in excess of 5500 ft, some higher than 10,000 ft).

What does this mean for the wine? Typically, older vines yield less fruit, but the fruit they do provide is very concentrated in flavors and potential extract.  Higher elevations tend to accentuate diurnal temperature variations, which can help in ripening [Note: that statement may be incorrect - see comments].  As you might expect, some of the wines we tasted last week were concentrated and rich, but over the course of six wines (2 reds, 2 whites from each of the three featured producers) we were treated to a surprisingly wide spectrum of tastes and styles, especially when it came to the flagship Argentine varieties Malbec and Torrontes.  In fact, some of the Malbec was downright soft & fruity, and some of the Torrontes was elegant and almost refined.

It’s gotten me excited for the next round of tastings this week – hopefully we’ll see equally high quality and breadth of styles from the other winemaking regions of Argentina.  In any case, I think TTL is onto yet another winning strategy.

Read on for a recap of the twitter feed from last week’s tasting…

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1WineDude in the L.A. Times (More on Wine Competition Controversy)

Vinted on September 7, 2009 binned in about 1winedude blog, wine publications

“One not only drinks wine, one smells it, observes it, tastes it, sips it, and—one talks about it.”
- King Edward VII of England

If the events of the past several days are any indication, one also enters it into wine competitions, and then one talks – and talks, and talks – about the results!

In case you’ve been living inside of a bottle lately, here’s a recap.:

Last week, the Journal of Wine Economics issued a report that included an article by Robert T. Hodgson titled An Analysis of the Concordance Among 13 U.S. Wine Competitions.  Hodgson’s report analyzed data garnered from 13 wine competitions and more-or-less concluded that the distribution of medals from those competitions showed no difference statistically then if the medals had been awarded by chance.

My personal take was that the report lacked sufficient analysis of the potential context impacting wine competitions for the data to support the conclusion drawn in the report – even if that conclusion might ultimately be true. Several people agreed and disagreed with me – which is one of the great things about blogging, after all!

The article was probably designed to kick-off discussion on the relative value of wine competitions in general, and no mater what your view of Hodgson’s analysis, it would be difficult to refute it’s success in doing just that.

The repercussions of the report were discussed on Dr. Vino, Vinography, and right here on 1wineDude.com – and judging by the excellent and myriad opinions on the topic that were voiced in the responses to those articles, the topic has more legs than half a glass of 16% abv Grenache.  The topic even found its way into the discussion forums on the mead website GotMead.com (seriously).

Topping it all off, on Friday the Business Section of the L.A. Times ran a story by Jerry Hirsch on the aftermath of the report, in which I was quoted.  What I liked about the L.A. times piece, aside from the fact that they spelled the name of my blog correctly (though they incorrectly stated that I am a Certified Wine Educator – I’m not, I’m a Certified Specialist of Wine, which is a different cert. but from the same organization), was that it had a slightly different take on the report  – namely, how the competition results are used after the competition is over…

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Weekly Twitter Wine Mini-Reviews Round-up for 2009-09-05

Vinted on September 5, 2009 binned in wine mini-reviews
  • 87 Tenuta San Guido Sassicaia (Tuscany): Cannonball shot of dark fruit awesomeness to your gut. Exit wound leaves huge hole in your wallet. #
  • 08 Domaine Tempier Rosé (Bandol): A strawberry patch surrounded by a spice garden, with an olive chaser. Dry as a bone. Worth the coin. #
  • 07 Karl Erbes Ürziger Würzgarten Riesling Spatlese (Mosel): Dare I eat a peach? Yes, when it's this noble, sweet, and refreshingly acidic! #
  • 07 Yannis Assyrtiko (Santorini): Like honey-nut cheerios, only salted, fermented, and without the cereal. Bring me squid, for pete's sake! #
  • 95 Château d'Yquem (Sauternes): Poetic & polished high-wire juggling act of honey, caramel, apricot, flowers, lemon curd & citric acidity #
  • 89 Ch. L'Evangile (Pomeral): That blackberry fruit is a little dusty. Everything turns out splendidly, of course. Could sniff this for ages. #
  • 89 Ch. Léoville Las Cases (St. Julien): Dark red fruit is more velvety than you'd 1st suspect. Graphite adds to the pleasure. Drink it now. #
  • 08 Terracita Tempranillo (Castilla): Boysenberry & woody vanilla that goes down almost too easily. At $9, you can afford to gulp it down. #
  • 08 Bodegas Etchart Torrontes Reserve (Cafayete): One sniff is like being at the flower shop (and the flower shop pairs well with sushi). #
  • 07 Bodega Colome Malbec (Calchaqui): The blackberries & violets will kick your ass so hard you might need to stand the rest of the night. #
  • 08 Michel Torino 'Don David' Torrontes (Cafayate): Torrontes dressed up for the ball – all elegance, class and subtle beauty. Gulp! #
  • 06 Michel Torino 'Don David' Cabernet Sauvignon (Cafayate): Someone set fire to a cherry-flavored graphite pencil! And damn, do I like it! #

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