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Wine Reviews: Weekly Mini Round-Up For October 13, 2014

Vinted on October 13, 2014 binned in wine mini-reviews
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HiYa! If you're new here, you may want to Sign Up to get all the latest wine coolness delivered to your virtual doorstep. I've also got short, easily-digestible mini wine reviews and some educational, entertaining wine vids. If you're looking to up your wine tasting IQ, check out my book How to Taste Like a Wine Geek: A practical guide to tasting, enjoying, and learning about the world's greatest beverage. Cheers!

So, like, what is this stuff, anyway?
I taste a bunch-o-wine (technical term for more than most people). So each week, I share some of my wine reviews (mostly from samples) and tasting notes with you via twitter (limited to 140 characters). They are meant to be quirky, fun, and easily-digestible reviews of currently available wines. Below is a wrap-up of those twitter wine reviews from the past week (click here for the skinny on how to read them), along with links to help you find these wines, so that you can try them for yourself. Cheers!

  • 12 m2 Wines Lodi Native Soucie Vineyard Zinfandel (Lodi): The native in these parts is jammy, dark, spicy, moody and sweetly complex. $NA A- >>find this wine<<
  • 13 Ernst Loosen Villa Wolf Pinot Gris (Pfalz): It's an instant pith party, all are invited, and the admission is practically free. $13 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 10 V. Sattui Preston Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon (Napa Valley): Licorice so black, it'd make the dark of a moonless night jealous. $55 A- >>find this wine<<
  • 13 Kellerei Kaltern Gewurztraminer (Alto Adige): The first cut is the… beefiest; it's also the lychee-ist, and maybe the tastiest. $15 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 12 Spell Winery Terra de Promissio Vineyard Pinot Noir (Sonoma Coast): Promises leather, spice, & big, dark britches for PN from SC. $72 A- >>find this wine<<
  • 13 Maison Nicolas Vouvray (Loire): Fresh apples, fresh flowers, fresh attitude, and okay, maybe one too many fresh, sweet kisses. $12 B >>find this wine<<
  • 11 Pere & Fils Christian Moreau Chablis (Chablis): Turning up the minerality volume, and juggling crisp green & yellow apples, too. $25 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 11 Spell Winery Marimar Estate Vineyard Pinot Noir (Sonoma Coast): Bouncing effortlessly from sweet red berry goodness to herbal bite $72 A- >>find this wine<<
  • 13 Bayten Sauvignon Blanc (Constantia): Big, and burly, but not without its bountiful, bright, buoyant, and persistent moments. $15 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 07 Istvan Szepsy Tokaji Aszu 6 Puttonyos (Tokaji): Gorgeous in all aspects, stunning in its splendor, & nearly perfect in execution. $240 A+ >>find this wine<<
  • 11 Domaine Grosbois Clos du Noyer Chinon (Chinon): The tannins & texture are drum-tight; but the funk is calling the shots here. $49 B+ >>find this wine<<

Reader Mailbag: Trying New Wine Is A Pain In The Ass

Vinted on October 9, 2014 binned in commentary, wine appreciation

1WD reader Matt (that’s all your getting, as I don’t have permission to print the person’s full name here) recently wrote to me via an email with a title so intriguing, it sparked the first-ever “reader mailbag” style post on this site in its seven-some-odd-year history:

“Trying New Wine Is A Pain In The Ass”

There’s much juiciness to be squeezed from Matt’s email, so I’ll first reprint it here before addressing Matt’s questions in detail:

“Let me rephrase that… Trying new *quality* wine is a pain in the ass, literally in the wallet. Its all a gamble really and I’d bet that the average person, let alone the active wine drinker wants to bet on a $50 bottle. We are not all in your position where nice wines may be shipped to us for tasting purposes in hopes that you blog about it.

So… My reason for contact is this. Today I read the article, ‘Wine execs are scared of the craft beer and spirits growth.’ You probably read it since its well circulated. Following the gambling terminology, beer and spirits have a relatively low buy-in. If that bet pays off and I like it, then I can opt for the higher price points. Quality wine, on the other hand, does not have this low cost of buy-in. It’s all or nothing and if you get burned once, then you will likely never go all-in on a 50+ bottle again.

I’m curious, do you have any opinions on opportunities of low buy-in options for higher priced wines? The tasting room is the only opportunity I can think of and that is not exactly mass market. When exactly does the average person opt for that $50 bottle cab? marketing fluff? friends advice? impressing the boss? Do wine drinkers randomly buy expensive wines that they have never had before? If not, when are they exposed to them that creates a buying opportunity? I’d love to hear your comments and what your readers may think. I’ve never met a wine I didn’t like… to try. Thanks Joe! Matt.”

Talk about food (or drink?) for thought! And Matt seems to want to hear your responses to all of this as well, so it’s giving us a nice opportunity to argue in the best internecine fashion that is the hallmark of modern wine discourse!

Well, Matt, following are my responses. I hope you don’t mind the delay, I just wanted to share the dialog with a (much) wider audience!…

Read the rest of this stuff »

Why Everyone Hates Us

Vinted on October 7, 2014 binned in commentary, wine news

Because… well… THIS:

Wine geeks and wine pros are taking it on the chin right now (for a hilarious and totally NSFW example, have a listen to this podcast by Internet comedy icon Maddox). We are accused of just about everything uncool, from being fond of snobbery to displaying nepotism to having bullsh*t jobs to engaging in major douchebaggery.

The image problem, though, is understandable, particularly when we have things like the Lalique “100 Points” leather briefcase by James Suckling and Salvatore Ferragamo, available for $8500 USD. At least you get a couple of bottles of wine with it. Go ahead, watch the video on James’s website. And if you order one, do me a favor and unsubscribe from my blog, okay?

James, why are you doing this to us, bro???

Fellow geeks, please make a good name for yourselves and other wine nerds by not carrying personal stemware around unless there’s a life-changing wine drinking experience expected that evening.

Also, please, please, please don’t wear scarves inside the house!

Cheers!

Wine Reviews: Weekly Mini Round-Up For October 6, 2014

Vinted on October 6, 2014 binned in wine mini-reviews

So, like, what is this stuff, anyway?
I taste a bunch-o-wine (technical term for more than most people). So each week, I share some of my wine reviews (mostly from samples) and tasting notes with you via twitter (limited to 140 characters). They are meant to be quirky, fun, and easily-digestible reviews of currently available wines. Below is a wrap-up of those twitter wine reviews from the past week (click here for the skinny on how to read them), along with links to help you find these wines, so that you can try them for yourself. Cheers!

  • 12 Bergstrom Sigrid Chardonnay (Willamette Valley): Kind of gorgeous; on second thought, scratch the "kind of" from that statement. $85 A >>find this wine<<
  • 12 Brick House Cascadia Chardonnay (Ribbon Ridge): Pears, peaches, pith, passion, poise, and a whole helluvah lotta crowd-pleasin'. $36 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 12 Brittan Vineyards Chardonnay (Willamette Valley): Well, that got vibrant quickly; will also oblige if you ask it to pass the toast $40 A- >>find this wine<<
  • 12 Walter Scott Vojtilla Chardonnay (Willamette Valley): Tension, texture, & a textbook case for rich, pithy & mineral WV Chard. $40 A- >>find this wine<<
  • 12 William Rose Gewurztraminer (Southern Oregon): Balanced scale of rose petals & freshness on 1 hand, honey sweetness on the other. $NA B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 12 William rose Dry Riesling (Southern Oregon): An austere laser beam of crisp, pear-like focus, giving off petrol vapors in its wake $18 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 08 Matello Whistling Ridge Blanc (Ribbon Ridge): Pithy kitchen sink blend that's been whistling a tasty tune for a number of years. $NA B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 12 Matello Hommage Pinot Noir (Willamette Valley): Like a mole, moving low & slow; but bright & also light on its little feet, too. $27 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 12 Division Chardonnay (Willamette Valley): Food-friendly to the extreme, but you'd better count yourself as a fan of earthiness 1st. $24 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 12 Andrew Rich Verbatim Pinot Noir (Willamette Valley): Young, spicy fruit, with dense muscles, hauling hefty heapings of earth. $30 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 13 Andrew Rich Croft Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc (Willamette Valley): Grapefruit, wet rocks, & lemongrass with aggressive intentions. $22 B+ >>find this wine<<

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