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The Top 10 Wine Books You Really Need (How To Become a Wine Geek – Part I) | 1 Wine Dude

The Top 10 Wine Books You Really Need (How To Become a Wine Geek – Part I)

Vinted on December 8, 2007 binned in best of, wine books, wine how to, wine tasting, wine tips
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This post is the first in a three-part series where Dude will give you a ‘wine insider’s’ take on how to seriously up your ‘wine geek’ knowledge (and hone your overall wine-tasting skills along with your “impress your party goers” wine profile).

When this Dude gives in-home wine tastings, probably the most frequently asked question is “How can I learn more about wine?” As Lao-tzu once said, “The Great Way is Easy” and he may have well been talking about obtaining wine knowledge, because Dude has been there and he can tell you that all it takes is three things:

  1. An open mind
  2. Patience
  3. More Patience


I usually recommend a three-step program, which I will cover individually in three posts (counting this as #1, with the others to follow relatively shortly):

  1. Read (see below)
  2. Taste
  3. Be Bold

Today’s post will tackle the reading bit, which I offer to you in Top 10 format. So without further ado, Dude presents:

The Top 10 Wine Books You Really Need

For Beginners

1. Oldman’s Guide to Outsmarting Wine by Mark Oldman
The book I wish I’d had as budding a wine novice. Mark Oldman provides what might be the best and most well-paced (not to mention most practical) wine introduction book on the market. As a beginner, you will not be disappointed.




2. Wine for Dummies by Ed McCarthy & Mary Ewing-Mulligan

THE starting point for your induction into the world of wine. I know the brother of one of the authors, both of whom really, really, really know their stuff.

3. How To Taste by Jancis Robinson
Great reading for the beginner who wants to learn more about how to enjoy wine, all done in an open and not-so-stuffy style. The important thing about this book is the emphasis on how to taste wine, which (as we will explore in Dude’s next post), is the single most important skill you can build to up your wine IQ.

Intermediate
4. The Wine Bible by Karen MacNeil
A mighty tome of accessible wine knowledge, with excellent primers on the wine regions of the world for the beginner wine enthusiast, but also with tons of detail for the advancing wine geek as well. A fantastic achievement and a book that will prove to be a valuable resource for years to come (I still refer back to my tattered copy).

5. Hugh Johnson’s Pocket Wine Book
Updated every year, this book packs a ridiculous amount of handy wine information into an impossibly small amount of space. The abbreviations take some getting used to, but once you have them down you will wonder how you even wandered into a wine store without the handy reviews. It’s also a great reference to have in the kitchen when trying to match up wine styles with dinner.


6. The New Sotheby’s Wine Encyclopedia by Tom Stevenson
A reference that is so handy, I destroyed the binding on my copy within weeks from overuse! I know both wine fans and wine industry pros that use this book, and it’s handy – and accessible enough – for both. Plus, Tom does not hold back his opinions on developments in the world’s wine regions and in the progress towards top quality from each area’s most important wines – not watered-down, and therefore entertaining as well as informative.

Advanced
7. The World Atlas of Wine by Hugh Johnson & Jancis Robinson
A beautiful coffee-table sized book for the budding wine geek, it’s an essential reference for those interested in increasing their detailed knowledge of where their favorites wines come from and why that plays such an important part in why those wines taste they way that they do.

8. The Oxford Companion to Wine by Jancis Robinson
This weighty tome is *the* wine reference book for the wine geek and wine professional. Not exactly easy to read in bed, but when you find yourself absolutely needing to know what terms like Recioto mean, you need this book. Also handy for finding interesting wine blog topics (and by the time you’re ready for this book, you will probably have your own wine blog…).

9. Wine Report (Annual) by Tom Stevenson
Another reference updated annually, this one is for the wine professional (or only the most serious of wine geeks). A great read for finding out what’s new and noteworthy in the world’s major wine regions and the industry in general.

Essential at Every Level
10. Your Very Own Wine Journal
You need your own wine journal to capture your reactions to wines that you taste, build an understanding of what you like (and dislike), and sharpen up your wine tasting vocabulary. The importance of this will get explored in my next post – but for now, just trust the Dude and get yourself a wine journal! (dude recommends the Little Black Wine Book).

The bad news – The whole kit & kaboodle will set you back about $150 – $175. So buy ‘em in stages (don’t worry, none of these are likely to go out of print anytime too soon).

The very good news is that the general state of wine writing
– much like the general state of wine itself – has never been better, so you will get your moolah’s worth. Long-time, prolific, and talented writers like Jancis Robinson, as well as a multitude of fine bloggers, are contributing accessible and well-written wine knowledge. Come on in – the water is fine!

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