Red Wine, Purple Teeth & Silver Linings: Premiere Napa Valley 2010

Vinted on March 1, 2010 binned in California wine, wine industry events

Sometimes the best way to convey the essence of an event is via comparison.  Especially when that event might be too noisy and hectic to capture on video.  Or, when you’re video recorder isn’t fully charged, so all you have are pictures, words, and memories.

And teeth stains.

Honestly, I think that my dentist is about to have a windfall…

Such is the essence of Premiere Napa Valley, which recently took place (February 20th) at the Culinary Institute of America in St. Helena, and is the spot where members of the Napa Valley Vintners Association hock ultra low-production amounts (often only one barrel / 5 cases worth) of (presumably) ultra-premium red wine.

Winning lot bidders obtain a unique product available nowhere else on the planet, specially bottled for their restaurant / merchants / stores / etc., along with (presumably) bragging rights at achieving the exclusivity.  In other words, it’s a (very stiff) competition, presenting (presumably) the best-of-the-best from 200 of Napa’s most storied and well-respected producers; a tooth-staining, mouth-puckering wine spectacle orgy of Cabernet-based California goodness.

As for the comparison: PNV is like a cross between Best In Show, the Superbowl, the Emmys, Calligula, and (with a lot of Japanese buyers thrown in for good measure) a Godzilla movie.

It will make sense, in a minute (or two)…

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Weekly Twitter Wine Mini-Reviews Round-up for 2010-02-27

Vinted on February 27, 2010 binned in wine mini-reviews
  • 08 Lamoreaux Landing Red Oak vineyard Riesling (Finger Lakes): As refreshing as a grapefruit & crisp green apple cocktail. $20 B #
  • 05 Swanson Vineyards Merlot (Oakville): Aiming for Right Bank Bord'x. Not a direct hit, but a killer black licorice effort anyway. $36 A- #
  • NV Alice White Lexia (SE Australia): Imagine a mango sorbet, but served at a cheap restaurant with tacky decor & annoying servers. $7 C+ #
  • 06 Sherwin Family Vineyards Estate Cabernet Sauvignon (Napa Valley): Like barnyard? This sucker is a downright state fair pony ride. $90 B #
  • 05 Cain "Five" (Napa Valley): A little fun-kay! Deep & black, with a ton of tar and a commandingly strong finish. Brace yourself! $109 B+ #
  • 07 Olson Ogden Syrah (Sonoma + Napa Counties): VERY tasty tune (& a song for NOW) but they're not quite singing in perfect harmony $28 B #
  • 08 Elderton Unoaked Chardonnay (Barossa): "G'day, mate," said the Minerals, "We'd sure fancy bein' noticed. Good on' ya!" $13 B- #
  • 06 Elderton Shiraz (Barossa): Gotta love that spicy aroma, but a mouthful is way too unctious (in just about every sense of the word) $23 C+ #
  • 08 Grey's Peak Pinot Noir (Waipara): Unpronounceable region. Pronounced spices & wild berry flavors. These kiwis got it goin' on. $22 B #
  • NV Trapiche Extra Brut (Mendoza): A fizzy w/ a splash of Malbec? Damn right! So much tasty toast, it could pass for a dinner roll. $13 B- #

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Robert Parker’s Job Is Safe (A Tasting Perspective on Premiere Napa Valley’s Perspective Tasting)

Vinted on February 25, 2010 binned in California wine, commentary, wine tasting

You probably could have guessed that Robert Parker isn’t at high risk for becoming unemployed anytime soon without me explicitly stating it, but I thought I should clear up that I’m not after his job, in case there develops any rampant speculation on that topic in the future.

This is because I have never been, am not, and will never be a Wine Tasting Maven.

The point was driven home to me quite clearly and forcefully last week at the 2010 Premiere Napa Valley’s Perspective Tasting, held on two floors (Chardonnays on the top floor, Cabs on the bottom floor) in the meticulously kept sensory analysis classrooms at The Culinary Institute of America in St. Helena.  To put it mildly, tasting three successive comparative vintages of Napa cabs and Chards, blind, lined up one after another in a mostly white, sterile environment was the equivalent of having a joy vacuum attached to my wine-loving soul and turned on full-blast.

Sterile. Quiet.  Introverted.  Not a drip of social aspect or drop of true enjoyment in sight.

I briefly contemplated the alternative activity of banging my head against the CIA’s gorgeous walls of earthtoned, irregular stones, until I bled and then passed out.  As it turned out, I tasted some wines instead (more on the specific wines in a minute. Or two.).  But I didn’t truly taste them – not the way I’d define ‘truly tasting’, anyway.

This isn’t the fault of the wines, vintners, CIA, or the other tasting participants – it’s my fault, without a single shred of doubt.  I am simply incapable of tasting wine – I mean, really tasting it – that analytically.  I’m sure that Parker could rip through that scenario in record time and then, just for shits and giggles, quiz himself on the merits of the 92-96 point scoring wines in the bunch 11 years later.  I watched friend and fellow symposium attendee and panelist Alder Yarrow sniff, spit, and scribble his way through every single one of the dozens of numbered carafes on display in the blind Cab tasting, as if he were a pleasant, well-poised, humanoid-shaped and purple-toothed machine.

I will never be that guy. 

And I never want to be that guy

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