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Come Heckle Me (And Sample Some World-Class Juice) At Taste Washington 2014

Vinted on March 18, 2014 binned in wine industry events
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HiYa! If you're new here, you may want to Sign Up to get all the latest wine coolness delivered to your virtual doorstep. I've also got short, easily-digestible mini wine reviews and some educational, entertaining wine vids. If you're looking to up your wine tasting IQ, check out my book How to Taste Like a Wine Geek: A practical guide to tasting, enjoying, and learning about the world's greatest beverage. Cheers!

On Sunday, March 30, I’ll be participating in what has become the U.S.’s largest wine and food event focused on a single region, Taste Washington at Seattle’s CenturyLink Field.

Those wishing to heckle me will find this one of the better opportunities afforded them in recent memory.

I’ll be a media guest at the Seattle event, taking part in a seminar at 11:30am titled “Washington vs. The World-2014.” I, Master Sommelier Emily Wines and winemakers Chris Gorman, Matt Reynvaan, Kendall Mix, Chris Camarda and Scott Greer will be pitting WA state wines against what is being billed as some world’s best juice. I feel compelled to point out that our session is 88.88% more expensive than every other wine education seminar being held over the course of the Taste WA weekend, from which I can only logically conclude that my fellow panelists are just 89% (rounded) more bad-ass than all of the other panelists on the program.

Ok, whatever.

How will Washington’s wines fare against some of the selected international and domestic contenders? I’ve no idea, but I fully expect the panel to be entertaining (I’ll try not to drag the I.Q. of the group too far down)…

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Wine Reviews: Weekly Mini Round-Up For March 17, 2014

Vinted on March 17, 2014 binned in wine mini-reviews

So, like, what is this stuff, anyway?
I taste a bunch-o-wine (technical term for more than most people). So each week, I share some of my wine reviews (mostly from samples) and tasting notes with you via twitter (limited to 140 characters). They are meant to be quirky, fun, and easily-digestible reviews of currently available wines. Below is a wrap-up of those twitter wine reviews from the past week (click here for the skinny on how to read them), along with links to help you find these wines, so that you can try them for yourself. Cheers!

  • 11 Donnafugata Sedara (Sicily): A reminder that appreciating life's simple pleasures is key to keeping us from ever being truly lost. $14 B >>find this wine<<
  • 12 Poggio Tondo Vermentino (Toscana): Pears, grass, flowers, hay, a refreshing attitude, and an honest, pure, down-to-earth delivery. $11 B >>find this wine<<
  • 09 Cinnabar Winery Amber Knolls Vineyard Malbec (Clear Lake): Lake County heat, California fruitiness, South American grip and soul. $65 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 10 Chimney Rock Stags Leap District Cabernet Sauvignon (Napa Valley): Knows it takes vibrancy to leap ahead of a pack of hungry Cabs. $68 A- >>find this wine<<
  • 11 John Duval Wines Entity Shiraz (Barossa): Displaying Texas barbeque levels of sweet, savory and all-around, easy-going tasty. $40 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 12 Gundlach Bundschu Estate Vineyard Gewurztraminer (Sonoma Coast): Iron fist, tropical glove, along with floral & spice baubles. $23 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 11 Gundlach Bundschu Estate Vineyard Chardonnay (Sonoma Coast): Key lime pie, only without the cloying bits & eaten as a main course. $27 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 11 Castello di Amorosa Bien Nacido Chardonnay (Santa Barbara County): Well born of power, toast, and butter. And toast. And butter. $38 B >>find this wine<<
  • 11 Castello di Amorosa Napa Valley Chardonnay (Napa Valley): Unabashedly toasty beverage currently seeking tryst with crabs & butter. $28 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 12 Castello di Amorosa Dry Gewürztraminer (Anderson Valley): High end, pungent, spicy lychees to satisfy lumberjack-sized thirsts. $25 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 12 J Vineyards Misterra Pinot Noir (Russian River Valley): With a splash of Pinotage, a splash of Meunier, & a splash of potential $50 B+ >>find this wine<<

We Now Interrupt This Wine Broadcast To Finally Answer The Big “Going Pro” Question…

Vinted on March 13, 2014 binned in about 1winedude blog, going pro

Picture this: It’s a gorgeous and sunny day in South Africa, and I’ve just finished giving the keynote address at the 2013 Nederburg Wine Auction. I’m drinking Cape bubbly and grazing for food, and mingling with interesting people from all over the Southern Hemisphere. Of course, I’m exchanging business cards with all of these folks – winemakers, media, buyers. Then the inevitable question comes (after the equally inevitable oohing and ahhing over my way-cool tiny moo.com business cards, I mean):

Them: “So… what do you do? In ‘real life,’ I mean?

Me: “You’re looking at it!”

I have to accept this as inevitable and totally understandable, since so few people can actually make any money whatsoever independently in the wine biz. How are you able to ditch your IT career? Is your wife insane for letting you do this kind of stuff?

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Can Terroir Be Bootstrapped? (Dude’s Take On Ventura County For Palate Press)

Vinted on March 11, 2014 binned in California wine, on the road

Stay out of Malibu, deadbeat!!!”

As a stunning display just how behind I am on everything, my take on the upstart, bootstrapping wineries of Southern California’s Ventura County was recently published over at PalatePress.com.

Yeah, that’s the one I talked about back in January when we featured the recent releases of Ventura’s Four Brix Winery (and that was written about six months after my visit). Whatever, look, I’m kind of busy lately, alright?

Thus endeth the triumvirate of articles I’d planned resulting from that S. Cal. jaunt, the remaining third being an overview of the wineries in the Ventura County wine trail for Wine.Answers.com. Mini-reviews might peek out here and there, though, to further highlight a few of my faves from the trip. Otherwise, it’s on to all of the other shizz on which I’m similarly several months behind.

The PalatePress.com piece continues a theme of sorts on which I’ve focused in my features over there: talking about off-the-beaten-wine-path vino areas about which almost no else is talking, and certainly mainstream media has been touching with a ten foot punch down pole, such as Ventura, Colorado, and Pennsylvania (incidentally, I’ll likely be sticking to that theme for future PP pieces, since whenever I veer from that and talk about ultra-expensive wines, or whether or not critical acclaim matters for wines that are so popular that they’ve created enduring brands, I create a veritable sh*t storm and get into all kinds of trouble… see, and you thought that only happened here on 1WD!).

But it (the article, I mean, which technically is still the subject, despite the ludicrously long sentence above) also explores the idea of whether or not Northern California’s vineyards exhibit terroir, and if so whether or not that individuality and vinous fingerprinting can be interpreted and displayed by bootstrapping upstarts buying the region’s grapes, just as the better producers on the Ventura County trail are attempting right now. I’m not yet convinced that they’ve fully achieved it, but the experiment is still in progress, and of course gives us geeky fodder about which to conjecture (is that a verb?… if not, it should be)…

Cheers!

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