Posts Filed Under crowd pleaser wines

Crème de la Krems (Grüner Veltliner Reserve Highlights from Kremstal)

Vinted on January 16, 2020 binned in crowd pleaser wines, elegant wines, kick-ass wines, on the road, wine review
Winzer Krems map room

Sure, this is impressive, but…

In the Austrian region of Krems, they know a thing or two (or two dozen) about winemaking; few wine-growing areas have its kind of historical depth, even when measured by European standards. Grape production in Krems dates back to the 3rd Century AD (during the reign of Probus); mentions of specific vineyards can be fond as far back as the 11th Century; and Krems itself officially became a town in 1305 partly because of the reputation of its vineyards.

Unfortunately, that impressively lengthy resume timeline doesn’t mean that they know how to properly combine cinema and map rooms in Krems, as I learned during a masterclass tasting held at Winzer Krems, the Kremstal’s long-standing co-op.

Raiders map room

…can it do *this*??

First of all, they have “4D” theater at Winzer Krems (that combines audio, 3D visual, and tactile/aromatic effects), the kind that most of us have encountered only at science academy museum spots in U.S. major cities. At first blush, that format seems a natural fit for a mini wine movie; in practice, it’s a bit disappointing in terms of translating what’s in an on-screen glass of vino. Winzer Krems also has an impressive map room, which shows the Kremstal in impressively sized detail.

Somehow, despite having both of those elements, they amazingly and inexplicably do not offer a recreation of the greatest map room scene in the history of cinema. Sorry, my Austrian friends, but it’s a very, very difficult thing for us cinema buffs to blithely gloss over such an egregious oversight. Fortunately, Kremstal has an ace up its sleeve: it offers some of the country’s better examples of Grüner Veltliner Reserve…

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Austria’s Kinda-Champagne (a Traisental Deep Dive)

Vinted on December 18, 2019 binned in crowd pleaser wines, elegant wines, kick-ass wines, on the road, wine review

 

Traisental 1

Apologies, right off the bat, for the headline clickbait: not only are we not talking about Champagne, we’re not even talking about sparkling wines. In fact, we’re really only talking about one grape – Grüner Veltliner – from one spot: Austria’s Traisental. Because, well, sometimes I can just be that kind of dick on my own website (for the curious, here’s a similar treatment of Austria’s Thermenregion, with me probably also being a bit of a dick).

This won’t be a waste of your time, however, especially if you love white wines, because the small-but-mighty (a mere 800-or-so hectares, dominated by small growers who farm 5-10 ha each on average) Traisental has some impressive geographical credentials that offer (and mostly deliver) the promise of some killer Grüner.

Stift Herzogenburg

Have 13C monastery, will travel

First, there’s the Traisen river, the recession of which created many a white wine grape’s favorite soil type: limestone deposits. Next, the loess soils here are primarily decomposed stone, with high amounts of chalk. The region’s slopes allow cooler air to move down to the valley, which mitigates frost. If all of this is sounding familiar, it’s because we can more-or-less say the same things about Champagne, making Traisental among the more unique spots in Austrian wine country.

At the stylish and historic (and difficult to pronounce) Stift Herzogenburg monastery (standing tall since 1244, folks), I tasted through about one billion (that figure may not be accurate) Traisental Grüners during my recent media jaunt to Austria; below, my friends, are the highlights (head’s up – I’ve no USD prices on any of the following, which might just be a 1WD first)…

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Putting a Thermal Spring in Your Step (the Wines of Thermenregion)

Vinted on November 6, 2019 binned in crowd pleaser wines, elegant wines, kick-ass wines, on the road, wine review
Freigut Thallern 1

Back in May (I know, I know…), I was a media guest for the 2019 Austrian Wine Summit, during which I was lucky enough to participate in a tour “along the Danube,” visiting and tasting through Austria’s classic wine producing regions.

It was pretty much as awesome as that sentence makes it sound.

Even so, I’ve (obviously over-)hesitated to jump into the coverage of that jaunt, mostly because such media group travels rarely lend themselves to overt story-lines. You visit; you taste; you all scramble to take pictures and find coffee; you eat; you drink; you move on to the next visit.

You also learn; in some cases, quite a lot, even if the stories being told lack the obvious dramatic flair of conflict. And so I think for our humble little coverage of Austria here, the stories will be the regions and wines themselves; many of which you almost certainly won’t have tried, because many lack appropriate representation in the USA (sorry!).

Freigut Thallern 2

Our first stop: tasting at one of Austria’s oldest wine estates, Freigut Thallern, in Thermenregion. Bordering Vienna and the Wienerwald woodlands, where a mere two thousand or so hectares of vineyards are divided into a whopping forty-two different community villages, Thermenregion’s average plots are understandably small – and the average yields even smaller (in fact, the lowest in all of Austria). You’ll find a thermal fault and plenty of thermal springs here, but interestingly no volcanic soils. Another interesting tidbit: Thermenregion’s white wines (which dominate in the region’s north), tend to see a bit of skin contact during vinification, an historical remnant used to help preserve the wines for travel. Speaking of the wines…

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Making Hay (Rowen Recent Releases)

Vinted on October 3, 2019 binned in crowd pleaser wines, kick-ass wines, on the road, wine review
Rodney Strong vineyards influencer
A totally-not-at-all-staged photo from Rodney Strong’s vineyards

The word rowen – which is of Middle English ancestry, from an Old Northern French variant of regain, and almost certainly will have your phone’s auto-correct annoyingly trying to change it to rower – almost literally means to make hay.

Well, technically, it means “a second growth of grass or hay in one season” – in other words, a lucky break of prosperity. It’s also the peculiar choice of Rodney Strong‘s latest (and most expensive) foray into a brand-within-a-brand, Rowen Wine Company – which, as I learned during a recent visit to their Sonoma HQ, began as a bit of a fluke.

Rodney Strong Sonoma

RS winemaker Justin Seidenfeld, apparently thinking that he needed to keep himself even busier, approached the Rodney Strong ownership with a request to use some of their winemaking space for his own experimental label.

They told him no. But with a caveat.

If he would make a new label for them, then Seidenfeld would be given free rein to make the wine in any way that he deemed fit; which in his mind was to be hand-crafted, premium, and exclusive. The results are probably a bit more expensive than what the RS ownership had anticipated…

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