Archive for January, 2018

Wine Reviews: Weekly Mini Round-Up For January 29, 2018

Vinted on January 29, 2018 binned in wine mini-reviews

So, like, what is this stuff, anyway?
I taste a bunch-o-wine (technical term for more than most people). So each week, I share some of my wine reviews (mostly from samples) and tasting notes with you via twitter (limited to 140 characters). They are meant to be quirky, fun, and easily-digestible reviews of currently available wines. Below is a wrap-up of those twitter wine reviews from the past week (click here for the skinny on how to read them), along with links to help you find these wines, so that you can try them for yourself. Cheers!

  • 15 Georges Duboeuf Chateau de Saint-Amour (Saint-Amour): This peppery, bright, but not-insubstantial delight will sneak up on you… proceed with caution. $22 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 08 F E Trimbach Riesling Clos Sainte Hune (Alsace): Everything here from the firm scaffolding through the tiny, detailed accoutrements says “instant classic.” $275 A >>find this wine<<
  • 11 F E Trimbach Riesling Clos Sainte Hune (Alsace): Seven years young, and thoroughly, transparently ethereal in ways that strongly suggest that the hype is not really hype. $225 A >>find this wine<<
  • 14 Sipp Mack Rosacker Grand Cru Riesling (Alsace): Well, that’s just lovely. I mean that literally, in this case; that’s just… dramatic pause… lovely! $43 A- >>find this wine<<
  • 14 Domaine Mittnacht Freres Rosacker Riesling Grand Cru (Alsace): Long & toasty, it’s what’s dancing on top that counts here; limes, saline, blossoms, wet stones, & awesomeness. $37 A- >>find this wine<<
  • 15 Domaine Frederic Mallo Riesling Grand Cru Rosacker (Alsace): You’ll come for the stone fruits, stay for the structure, and wish that the finish stayed longer than it does. $37 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 15 Domaine Jean-Luc Mader Riesling Grand Cru Rosacker (Alsace): Poise, power, pith, precision, and a plethora of spice and we’ve pretty much run out of P words now. $45 A- >>find this wine<<
  • 15 Simonsig Chenin Avec Chene Wooded Chenin Blanc (Stellenbosch): Heady, sexy, perfumed in just the right amounts, and profoundly difficult to resist. $36 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 12 Simonsig Merindol Syrah (Stellenbosch): With the oak, sweetness, & extraction, you’ll want to hate it; and you’d be a complete fool for doing so, because it kicks ass. $44 A- >>find this wine<<
  • 16 FEL Chardonnay (Anderson Valley): Baskets-full-of-daisies fresh, but not skimping on the rich apricot promise that is so quintessentially Californian… dude… $32 B+ >>find this wine<<
0

 

 

Hiatus, And The American Booze Wholesaler Swamp

Vinted on January 24, 2018 binned in wine news
nawr.org

image: nawr.org

I’d fully intended to provide some peripatetic and yet somehow also sublimely insightful wine review action for you this week (and I’ve much to tell you about my recent jaunt to Israeli wine country, too). But nature has intervened, once again declaring herself the boss, and me her beeeatch, by providing me with a cold/fever combination, and a broken toe.

Good times!

Anyway, I’m going to actually listen to that harsh task mistress and get up off of my feet for once and just rest and heal. Which means I’ll be delayed in getting things written up here. In the meantime, however, I’d encourage you to check out Wholesale Protection 2018: A Report on Alcohol Wholesaler Campaign Contributions, a new report by the National Association of Wine Retailers (NAWR), whose Executive Director is my friend Tom Wark. According to the press release, the report “examines the amount of money America’s alcohol middlemen give to state political campaigns, to whom they give it and the differences on a state-by-state level.”

Which basically means that you can see which of your state’s politicians actually kinda-sorta works more for the Booze Wholesaler Man, political-swamp-style, then they actually do for you. Two quick takeaways from my perusal:

1. The Wine & Spirits Wholesalers of America has some cash, baby, and they are not afraid to use it.

2. Repubs have the edge in accepting the coin when it comes to these donations, as do incumbents; in the case of the latter, it’s a a whopping 76%, strongly suggesting that the focus is keep the status quo…

Cheers!

0

 

 

Wine Reviews: Weekly Mini Round-Up For January 22, 2018

Vinted on January 22, 2018 binned in wine mini-reviews

So, like, what is this stuff, anyway?
I taste a bunch-o-wine (technical term for more than most people). So each week, I share some of my wine reviews (mostly from samples) and tasting notes with you via twitter (limited to 140 characters). They are meant to be quirky, fun, and easily-digestible reviews of currently available wines. Below is a wrap-up of those twitter wine reviews from the past week (click here for the skinny on how to read them), along with links to help you find these wines, so that you can try them for yourself. Cheers!

  • 16 Cave Vinicole de Hunawihr Riesling Rosacker (Alsace Grand Cru): Above all else, freshness reigns here; and citrus sits beside it on the throne. $25 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • 10 Cave Vinicole de Hunawihr Riesling Rosacker (Alsace Grand Cru): A basket full of apricots and flowers, with an extra of lemon candy for later. $NA A- >>find this wine<<
  • 12 Domaine Eblin-Fuchs Riesling Rosacker (Alsace Grand Cru): High-wire act tension, at once tightly wound and expressively elegant. $NA A- >>find this wine<<
  • 14 Domaine Agape Riesling Rosacker Grand Cru (Alsace): Gorgeous, linear, and chock full of enough minerals to nearly fill an ancient buried cavern. $46 A- >>find this wine<<
  • 15 Domaine Agape Riesling Rosacker Grand Cru (Alsace): About as electric and energetic as such a vintage could provide; those tropical & stone fruits are lightly salted, too. $46 A- >>find this wine<<
  • 14 LaJota Vineyard Co. Howell Mountain Estate Merlot (Napa Valley): A spirited game, played with both a sense of joy and the focus of a well-experienced master of the sport. $80 A >>find this wine<<
  • 14 Cornerstone Cellars Benchland Cabernet Sauvignon (Napa Valley): Like a great metal concert; a talented assault on many of the senses, asking and taking no quarter. $65 A- >>find this wine<<
  • 12 Sokol Blosser Pinot Noir (Dundee Hills): Just about equal portions of brightness, earthiness, refinement, and refreshingly accessible affordability. $38 A- >>find this wine<<
  • 16 Troon White Family Vineyard Kubli Bench Blanc (Applegate Valley): Both Rhone-ish and Roguish, and both of those in both thoroughly lovable ways. $25 B+ >>find this wine<<
  • NV Juve & Camps Pinot Noir Brut Rose (Cava): Not condoning violence here, but anyone who hates on Cava needs to be hit upside the head with a half-open bottle of this. Theoretically, of course. $15 B >>find this wine<<
0

 

 

I’ll Be Here, Hiding Under The Blanket (January 2018 Wine Product Review Roundup)

Vinted on January 17, 2018 binned in wine books, wine products

It’s time for the first monthly wine product sample review round-up of the new year, which means you now have a couple of recommendations for vinous-related things to buy after you’ve returned the crappier gifts that you received during the holidays! You’re welcome!

Since it’s been as cold as Dante’s icy ninth circle of hell around here lately, I decided to focus on reading material, all the better to curl up in front of a fireplace with (drink in hand, naturally) and enjoy while hiding from the real world under a cozy blanket.

Red wine bookFirst up is Red Wine: The Comprehensive Guide to the 50 Essential Varieties & Styles, (Sterling Epicure, 288 pages, $27.95) by three people that I happen to know personally (consider yourself full-disclosure-warned): the affable World Wine Guys Mike DeSimone and Jeff Jenssen, and the legendary Kevin Zraly (who might actually still owe me some money). This well-designed book has been getting serious positive press lately, and I’m happy to report that it’s well-deserving of all of it. The subtitle is apt, as Red Wine focuses on being comprehensive rather than exhaustively deep. Having said that, for 98% of wine lovers, they will not need (nor are they likely to find) a better guide to world’s fine red wine grapes than this one. Each grape gets at least a two-page spread that includes wine color, a tasting profile scale that focuses on the wine’s acidity/body/tannin combo, tasting notes and food pairings with at-a-glance icon references, a photo, a brief write-up, and a list of recommended wines to try (from bargain through to splurge price-levels). More ubiquitous grapes get a longer treatment, focusing on stylistic variances between countries, as well as winemaker quotes, and a handful of obscure red varieties (Teran, anyone?) get short highlights. Mad props to Christine Heun, who is credited as the designer, for putting together one of the easiest to navigate references I’ve ever seen in the wine world.

Drink ProgressivelyClosing out this month’s roundup, we have the gorgeously-photographed (think major food-porn style) Drink Progressively: From White to Red, Light- to Full-Bodied, A Bold New Way to Pair Wine with Food (Spring House Press, 240 pages, $27), by Hadley & TJ Douglas, the husband-and-wife owners of Boston’s The Urban Grape. This is a food-and-pairing-focused wine guide, and includes recipes by Straight Wharf’s Gabriel Frasca. The main idea behind Drink Progressively is to focus on wine body above all else, and then suggest wines and recipes to match that body accordingly. The Douglases do this by moving wines through an increasing body scale of 1 to 10, which leaves us with shorthand terms like “5W” (to describe whites from Burgundy and Mosel, for example) and “9R” (e.g., for bolder reds from Dry Creek Valley, Mendoza, and Barossa). It’s a clever, seemingly-simple conceit that I found gets confusing very quickly. Having said that, this book might be worth the cover price for the recipes and wine recommendations alone, though the latter tend towards the geekier (and therefore probably more difficult to find) end of the spectrum. The unsung hero here is Beatrice Peltre, whose photographs are downright stunning.

Cheers!

0

 

 

The Fine Print

This site is licensed under Creative Commons. Content may be used for non-commercial use only; no modifications allowed; attribution required in the form of a statement "originally published by 1WineDude" with a link back to the original posting.

Play nice! Code of Ethics and Privacy.

Contact: joe (at) 1winedude (dot) com

Google+

Labels

Vintage

Find

Sign up, lushes!

Enter your email address to subscribe and get all the good stuff via email.

Join 35,449 other subscribers