Baby’s Got Malbec (Heading to the International Malbec Days in Cahors)

Vinted on May 17, 2010 binned in commentary, on the road, wine news

If you live in the U.S. (and chances are high that if you’re reading this, you are in the U.S.), then it’s likely that you’ve been drinking some low-priced Malbec wine lately.

Don’t take my word for it – for some hard data on Malbec drinking trends in the U.S., you can check out a recent article by Laura Saieg on WineSur.com:

According to a report issued by Nielsen, in the last 52 weeks, the consumption of Malbec grew by 60%. This makes Malbec the best performing variety in the US market… In 2009, in spite of the pronounced decline of American economy, there was a consumption increase of 6 million cases with respect to 2008. Most of these cases were within the retail price bracket of under USD 10 per bottle. This was due to the fact that, in response to the crisis, consumers changed their habits and chose less expensive wines. Americans changed from consuming less expensive bottles to focusing on obtaining the best possible value. Restaurant wine sales fell by 6% to 9% this year as consumers, under tight budgets, stopped dining out and preferred to stay at home and buy wine at wine stores.”

Maybe you’ve had one (or several) of those extra 72 million bottles of Malbec consumed in the good ol’ U.S. of A. last year?  Looks like we can’t get enough of the stuff.

What’s most interesting, from a marketing / consumption / trending standpoint, is that you probably had that bottle at home while overall you were drinking less expensive wine (in both senses of the term).

By any measure, that’s a big coop for Malbec producers during the global recession, and it will be interesting to see if the trend continues.  It’s unclear from the WineSur.com article if most of the Malbec that we Americans gulped down was from Argentina, but it’s not unreasonable to conclude that.

Which might be why the French, who invented the stuff, are coming (possibly quite late) to Malbec bandwagon party…

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Weekly Twitter Wine Mini-Reviews Round-up for 2010-05-15

Vinted on May 15, 2010 binned in wine mini-reviews
  • 06 Ravines Dry Riesling (Finger Lakes): Going for “steely” and hitting the mark w/ fennel, floral, and a firm acid structure. $17 B #
  • 08 Ravines Argetsinger Vineyard Dry Riesling (Finger Lakes): The Asian pear & sweet apple are good now but the acid promises a future $25 B+ #
  • 07 Ravines Cabernet Franc (Finger Lakes): Lush but not plush, fruit-driven but downright elegant. I think they’re onto something here $18 B+ #
  • 07 Ravines Glenn Eldridge Vineyard Merlot (Finger Lakes): A mash of prunes, cocoa & spicy oak. For the price, a curiosity only? $30 B- #
  • 08 Standing Stone Riesling Icewine (Finger Lakes): Very sweet, very floral, very acidic, very well-balanced, but not very focused. $25 B #
  • 07 Anthony Road “MRS” Estate Cabernet Franc (Finger Lakes): Freakishly bad for the price & much less than should be expected of AR. $30 C- #
  • 08 Anthony Road “MRS” Berry Selection Riesling (Finger Lakes): Killer tangerine & lemon candy nose. Luscious w/ demanding acidity. $65 A- #
  • 07 Shaw Riesling (Finger Lakes): A palate no unlike lime-flavored 7-Up or Sprite, and not at all in any way that resembles good. $16 C- #
  • 05 Shaw Cabernet Sauvignon (Finger Lakes): A tar & black-fruit beauty with a tasty structure as solid and focused as a steel beam. $35 B+ #
  • 08 Atwater Gewurztraminer (Finger Lakes): Racy with quine, lychee, & a price that still won’t convince you to venture from Alsace. $16 B- #

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Not Just Riesling Country: The Finger Lakes’ Case for Cool Climate Reds

Vinted on May 13, 2010 binned in on the road, wine tasting

“They already got themselves a woodchuck today.”

Sam Argetsinger was leading a slow but determined downhill walking pace, flanked by his two dogs who had done the woodchuck hunting before we’d arrived. He is stout, and affable, and his wide smile accentuates a face of weathered features. Sam’s vineyard is small, relatively steep, and on the morning of May 8 it was playing host to a series of alternating bursts of warming sunshine from above, and strong cold breezes off of New York’s Seneca Lake.

A group of thirty-odd wine writers and bloggers descended onto the area as part of TasteCamp East; I was part of a dozen-or-so who were taking a morning tour of Sam’s vineyard on the second day of our trip. We had already, in a mere half-day, tasted dozens and dozens of Finger Lakes wines, some of which have been sourced from Sam’s vineyard.

“The other thing about woodchucks,” added Sam, stopping briefly and turning to face a small number of our group walking closest to him, and uttering the words without a modicum of sarcasm, “is that they’re delicious.”  We laugh, of course – most of us aren’t farmers and none of us has ever tasted woodchuck.

“Must taste like chicken!” one of us says.  Sam’s response – again without hesitation and appearing completely genuine: “Naw – it tastes like muskrat, mostly.”  Sam then briefly explains how woodchuck gut can be employed to create a fine-sounding drum skin.

Welcome to the Finger Lakes, folks, where the water – carved out of the land like the claw marks of angry gods by retreating glaciers eons ago – runs long, narrow, and deep, like the traditions and views of the region’s people.

It would have been easy to joke that a Fingers Lake red is the best thing to pair with that woodchuck (or muskrat), given the past history of red wines from the region.  And there certainly is nothing about Sam’s vineyard that would suggest anything other than the belief that This Is Riesling Country: from the steep plantings facing the water, to the heightened amplification of every nuance of viticulture – aspect, elevation, light exposure, ripening… we might as well be in the Mosel, right?

Exactly what you’d expect of the Finger Lakes.

That is, until you taste the wines that aren’t Riesling.  Until you taste the region’s new reds…

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