2 for 1(WineDude) Music Giveaway!

Vinted on July 22, 2010 binned in giveaways

I had a hankerin’ for a giveaway, and for something fun and off-beat (I know, right?  me being offbeat?  what-what-WHAT?!??) and so for this edition of giveaway action we’re doubling up on the prizes and YOU can win just by leaving a comment!

I was recently (that’s “recently” as in my version of “recently” – which is measured in months – and not recently in normal human terms) turned onto a band called side FX, who feature the interesting vocals of wine fan Kim Cameron, and who (according to their publicist) have built their career by performing at wine tasting events.

Now, as a member of a hard-working (that’s “hard working” in the “It’s a long way to the top if you wanna rock’n’roll” AC/DC sense, not in the 9-to-5 sense) rock band myself who has played in just about every scenario that you can imagine (including wine tasting events, which are usually a great gig), I was intrigued and the publicist sent over some review copies of side FX’s album Turning Point [ for laughably funny “rawk stah” photos of me pretending to be a musician, check out the inset pics below ].

Fans of well-crafted, pop-infused hooks and musicianship will dig Turning Point, I think – the more astute listeners will pick out a variety of influences from `80s Go-Go’s pop to country and UK club dance beats.

Anyway, today we’re giving away a copy of Turning Point and throwing in a copy of my band’s pop-influenced album Cloud & Water.  Here’s how it works:

YOU leave a comment describing the worst band that you ever saw live while you were drinking (because if a band stinks when you’re buzzing, then they probably really suck). In one week, using a super-secret random process, I will select one commenter as the WINNER.

My personal selection of the worst band that I ever saw while drinking (that’s while I was drinking, though I’ve no proof that the band in question wasn’t drinking)  is going to surprise you…

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Endangered Species: Santorini Wine Fights For Its Survival

Vinted on July 21, 2010 binned in best of, on the road

All this was green – from here until the sea.

George Koutsoyannopoulos has a round, friendly face that belies the seriousness of what he is telling me, one arm on the steering wheel of his “Volcan Wines mobile,” the other gesturing over me towards the passenger side window as we ride up the twisting, winding passage towards one of Santorin’s higher points.  We’re on our way to lunch at the local taverna; a Greek lunch, mind you – the kind that is of Homeric epic proportions even by European standards.  It’s the kind of lunch that will last hours and showcase the best local cuisine that the island has to offer, the kind of lunch where you might just forget how to walk by the time it finally concludes. 

Typical day at the office, right?

From the vantage point of the front passenger-side window, I don’t see vineyards in the valley below as it stretches out to the rocky beach and then the Aegean; I see an airport.

“Building in Santorini has reduced due to the recent economy,” George says, “from the `80s to 2000 was the biggest expansion.  But the airport had the biggest impact on the vineyards.”

George is a brave man.  I know this not because he is driving recklessly – he isn’t (in fact, his driving, like the pace of just about everything else on this gorgeous volcanic oasis, can best be described as “laid back”).  I know it because he is one of the driving forces behind the island’s Wine Museum, which chronicles the history of Santorini’s viticulture from 1660 through the 1970s.  For one thing, the museum, while an informative treasure trove of the unique and ancient story of viticulture on Santorini, is underground and populated with some of the eeriest animatronic humanoid automatons I’ve ever seen – there is no way I could walk through it at night without totally losing it in an apoplectic, fetal-positioned mess of abject fear. 

More importantly, George’s investment in the museum is a brave gamble, part of a battle being fought to protect the island’s vineyards – and the history of Santorini’s wine culture, itself a miracle of human ingenuity vs. the forces of nature – from extinction.

The greatest threat to the way of the wine on this most-beautiful of all of Greece’s Aegeanic treasures?

Tourism

The island is simply too gorgeous not to be visited, and the result of its open embrace to the throngs of tourists who visit each year is a bit of a cold shoulder when it comes to preserving its time-weathered culture of unique, indigenous wine…

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Losing It: El Camino del Vino (A Real Wine Movie, At Long Last?)

Vinted on July 19, 2010 binned in commentary

Sommelier and wine educator Charlie Arturaola and film directors Nicolás Carreras & Sebastián Carreras may just be putting together the most intimate wine movie yet made, and one that finally may have just the kind of reality-show crossover appeal to gain success among wine pros, wine geeks, and non wine-lovers alike.

At least, that’s the sense that I got from viewing the well-made trailer for El Camino del Vino (“The Ways of Wine” – with “Ways” taking on multiple nuances of meaning).

Like all promising films, El Camino del Vino starts with disaster and conflict, and promises to end with redemption. For wine pros and budding wine enthusiasts, the premise of the film is particularly terrifying (emphasis is mine):

“Charlie travels to Argentina invited to do tastings at the prestigious Masters of Food and Wine event at the Park Hyatt Hotel in Mendoza. Before the festivities begin at the Masters, Charlie is shooting a publicity spot for a wine and disaster strikes.  The combination of the pace of the shoot and a red dye used to enhance the photographic contrast and deepen the color of the wine, provoke the complete loss of his palate.”

I imagine that the loss of Charlie’s ability to taste wine critically echoes a deeper fear for many, many people in the modern industrial working world: What do you do when you lose the very thing upon which you rely to make your living?

I’ve met Charlie and he is warm, friendly, knowledgeable and approachable – exactly the kind of guy to whom you wouldn’t want this sort of thing to happen.  And it didn’t – not in real life, anyway.  But based on the trailer for El Camino del Vino, Charlie puts in a convincing performance, especially for someone who makes his living on wine and not via acting.  After seeing the trailers, I’m stoked to try to see this film when it gets released in August.

I caught up with Charlie last week (via e-mail and in-between trips for both of us) to briefly talk about the film and how he went about playing the part of himself.  Check out the trailer and the short interview below…

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