blogger web statistics/a>
Wine Products | 1 Wine Dude - Page 3

Posts Filed Under wine products

Invisible, Man (Sampling New Stemware from Ravenscroft)

Vinted on May 19, 2010 binned in wine products

Given its name, you’d expect the “invisibles collection” – a new line of glassware from crystal makers Ravenscroft, to be light, and probably thin.

You’d be right of course, based on the stemware sample that they sent to me recently.

What you might not expect, though, is the effect that the “Invisibles” glass has on the wine within it – at least, I wasn’t expecting the surprising effect that I experienced.

More on that in a minute (or two).  First, I want to cover the aesthetics of the glass itself – both good and bad.

The particular sample I received was one of Ravenscroft’s Invisibles Chianti/Riesling glasses, which they recommend for use when drinking “Beaujolais, Carignan, Chianti, Cotes du Roussillon, Dolcetto, Montepulciano, Primitivo, Red Zinfandel, Sangiovese and Teroldego.” Oddly, Riesling isn’t mentioned in the list, but since it’s in the name of the model line, it’s the wine I used to test it out.

The first thing you notice is that the glass is very light and is quite thin, and it feels very well-balanced when you’re holding it by the stem and it has a standard 1/3-full pour in it.  Despite the light weight, it doesn’t feel at all flimsy.  Over-pouring does, however, make the glass feel unbalanced in your hand, which I suppose is a reasonable trade-off given the light weight (you shouldn’t be over-pouring anyway, you lush!).

The Invisibles line are hand-made and lead-free, and my sample glass had subtle but noticeable flaws of air bubbles in the base and at the very bottom of the stem, and the base didn’t sit perfectly flat on a smooth level table surface.  I’m not a glass snob (and I really dug the overall tulip-shaped design), but if you’re coughing up over $40 for a set of stemware you’d probably be within rights to send back the glass for a replacement if it had the same issues as my sample, even if it’s blown by hand.

Ok, so after all of these aesthetic cavils, what about what the glass does to the wine?…

Read the rest of this stuff »

The Funky Reclaimed Wine Stylings of 8point8

Vinted on May 10, 2010 binned in wine products

An interesting set of sample items found their way to my door recently.  Not wine, but wood.

The wood (or rather what’s been done to the wood) is the brainchild of Brian Behncke, a construction company owner who is in the process of starting up a wood reuse company in San Diego.  The idea is to reclaim cedar fencing wood that would otherwise be on its way to the Mira Mar landfill, and instead turn it into handmade, interesting but functional discussion pieces, with wine as one of the major themes.

According to Brian:

“Due to the cost of taking the nails out of the wood, it goes directly into the landfill. Although it takes a little more time to clean the wood up, we feel this is a small price to pay for keeping large quantities of useable wood out of the landfill. We know there is a more sustainable way to deal with the problem, and that is to repurpose it.”

Brian’s new endeavor, 8point8, is currently selling unique takes on wine storage, carrying cases, and other household items.  The designs overall are functional, fun, and (at times) striking – especially the angled 3-bottle displays, which I personally found perfect for my leftover Madeira (see pic below – and yes, that is still the same Madeira from nearly two years ago – I told you, that stuff is indestructible!)…

Read the rest of this stuff »

Do You Take Wine Notes? (Giveaway! 33 Bottles of Wine Pocket Notebook Edition)

Vinted on April 26, 2010 binned in giveaways, wine products

Well… do ya?

We’ve got another nifty giveaway this week (this time courtesy of Scout Books) to help stimulate some stimulating conversation about taking detailed wine tasting notes.

The thing is, I don’t do it.

I know.  I suck.

Seriously, though, I don’t take copious notes when it comes to tasting wine.  At massive tastings such as Premiere Napa Valley I certainly do take notes, because otherwise it would be hopeless – but those notes certainly aren’t detailed, and usually are just enough text to jar my memory, where the real tasting notes are kept.

In similar fashion, I don’t keep a very good written record of what’s in my cellar (personal or wine samples), tough I’d argue that the record in my brain is pretty damn good.

Fallible?  Certainly, but it doesn’t seem to be slowing things down on 1WineDude.com so I’ve no plans to change it.  But that doesn’t mean that I advocate anyone else mimicking my behavior; in fact, I preach just the opposite, I’ve spent a lot of time studying systematic approaches to wine tasting, and I think it’s essential for those learning about wine to record detailed thoughts on their experiences. I just don’t do it myself, in the same way that my band can play successful gigs without practicing – there comes a time when you get comfortable enough that you don’t need to do those things as often (though of course you still benefit from doing them!).

Which is where tools like Scout’s 33 Bottles of Wine come in – and we’re giving away a three pack ($12 value) of their way-cool tasting journal

Read the rest of this stuff »

Your Screwing Preferences (Giveaway!)

Vinted on March 15, 2010 binned in giveaways, wine products

I’m talking about corkscrews, people.

Geez, what were you thinkin’?  Honestly, this is about wine, it’s supposed to be sophisticated, right?  So get your mind out of the gutter already!

Since I read up on the topic of corkscrews in the excellent Pocket Edition of Wine For Dummies, I’ve been wondering what corkscrews people prefer.  Also, giveaways of some excellently cool wine gear are involved, so pay attention!

A few days ago, I had a visit from a buddy of mine who just passed his WSET Dimploma, and we got to opening, well, a lot of wine to celebrate.  My buddy is left-handed, and he has a left-handed waiter’s friend corkscrew, which doesn’t sound all that strange until you try to insert the thread of the left-handed corkscrew into a cork using the common right-handed approach, and then it more or less becomes a total mind-f*ck.  It’s like trying to tie your shoes backward.

I find that wine geeks (like me) tend to get almost religiously passionate about their corkscrews.  Or, in my case at least, passionate about the corkscrews that they don’t like.

My corkscrew of choice is the waiter’s friend model (portable & trusty), but I’ll gladly use any corkscrew that has a thread that will easily insert into the cork without destroying it. Which is why I despise “winged corkscrews” with an angry passion bordering on jihad; those things tear up a cork mercilessly, and I’m convinced the model was designed by someone who hates wine and thought it would be funny watching wine lovers chew on bits of cork while they were sipping their favorite beverage.  Jerks.

Anyway, today I’m teaming up with TrueFabrications.com, purveyors of wine goodies and accessories, to find out what corkscrew styles YOU prefer, and to give you free stuff! (read on for dets)…

Read the rest of this stuff »

The Fine Print

This site is licensed under Creative Commons. Content may be used for non-commercial use only; no modifications allowed; attribution required in the form of a statement "originally published by 1WineDude" with a link back to the original posting.

Play nice! Code of Ethics and Privacy.

Contact: joe (at) 1winedude (dot) com

Google+

Labels

Vintage

Find