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3 Sure-fire Rules for Passing Sobriety Checkpoints

Vinted on July 21, 2008 under commentary, wine health

This past Friday, at about 2AM, I was driving back home after a long day, a great Mexican dinner with some foodie friends, and a very fun gig with my band in downtown West Chester.

I was stopped about halfway home, on backroads, by a police sobriety checkpoint.

Had I been drinking that night? Well… duh…!

Did I drink responsibly, ending my alcohol intake hours before I had planned to head home after the gig? Yep.

Did I ‘pass’ this sobriety checkpoint?

Of course, I ‘passed’ the sobriety checkpoint, thanks to my tried-and-true, never-fail, guaranteed-to-work or your-money-back 3 Rules for Passing Sobriety Checkpoints.

Today, free of charge, I’m going to share my 3 Rules with you…!



The 1WineDude.com 3 Rules for Passing Sobriety Checkpoints:
  1. Don’t be drunk.
  2. Be Sober.
  3. Don’t be ‘Not-sober’.

There you have it! Simple, straight-forward, and guaranteed-to-work – or your money back!

For more on responsible wine-drinking, see these previous 1WineDude.com articles:

Have a happy – and responsibly safe! – Monday.

Cheers!

(images: www.flickr.com/photos/stacylynn, timeinc.net)

Does Wine Taste Better When You’re Dining Out?

Vinted on July 16, 2008 under commentary, wine tasting


PressDemocrat.com posted a piece today by Bonnie Walker that explores why wine might taste better when you’re out on the town. It’s certainly worth a read if you’ve ever wondered how much of your wine tasting adventures were influenced by your surroundings.

Bonnie’s article lists certain tings that finer restaurants are able to do to that aren’t as easy for us to do playing along at home – among them maintaining optimal storage conditions, and paying special attention to how glassware is treated. Presumably, these things could make a wine ultimately taste better in the restaurant than the same wine that was stored above your fridge and then drunk from a plastic Burger King cup.

What I really liked about the article was how it finished:

“Finally, we get to what is a subjective reason that wine served at a restaurant might taste better than the same wine served at home. That might be simply because we’re out, relaxed, not working to put a meal on the table or distracted by TV.

If the wine is being shared by friends, so much the better. Even if it’s just a relative perception that the wine is better, that’s always something to count as pleasure added.”

Ahhh – the old “Lubricant for Life” hypothesis!

I buy into that, because I think that wine tasting fundamentally has subjective qualities to it that cannot be totally ignored when evaluating whether or not you will like a wine.

How about you?

Cheers!

(images: seagrassdublin.com)

Three Reasons Why You Should Be a Wine Blogger

Vinted on July 15, 2008 under best of, commentary, wine 2.0, wine blogging


A few days ago I published a somewhat controversial post giving you three reasons why you shouldn’t become a wine blogger.

Now, I’m about to give you three reasons why you should wine blog. [Editor's note: is 'wine blog' a verb now?]

My intention is not to flip-flop a position. I’m just trying to give you both sides of the bogger coin. And this is definitely the shinier, more polished, ‘much-more-coolly-embossed with some awesome emblem’ side of that coin. [Editor's note: is 'coolly' an adverb? My god, man, we're off to a shaky start here!!]

Anyway, let’s get down to business; here’s my Top Three Reasons Why YOU Should Be a Wine Blogger…:


1) You need to be original from day one.
No, you’re not going crazy. Yes, this is the #3 reason I listed previously for why you shouldn’t be a wine blogger. No, it’s not easy to offer an original voice in the wine blogging community. Or is it…? The positive flipside of this coin is that you have a no-to-low cost opportunity to have your voice heard on a topic that you are passionate about – and in time, people will listen to that voice. The line between professional/expert opinions and the voice of the on-line masses is blurring. There’s never been a better time to be a part of any topic for which you have a passion.

2) Two’s company, Three’s a crowd, and 600 is a Wine Blogging Community.
This one might look familar to you also [Editor's note: Sensing a theme here? ]. According to some sources, social media has overtaken porn in on-line popularity. We musicians in the rythym section often say “if you’re not part of the groove, you’re part of the problem.” Well, if you’re not part of social media, you’re really not part of the Internet. Not only is it a great time to be a part of the wine blogging community, it’s ridiculously easy to do so. Hop on over to OpenWineConsortium.org, join (for free), friend me up, and start blogging. Total cost: $0.00. Total time: about 6 minutes.

3) Democratize the Wine World.
It’s not often that you get to be a part of history. And history is being made in the world of wine, on the web, right now as you read this. It might sound a bit overly dramatic [Editor's note: OK, a lot], but can you think of a better term to describe a movement that gathers people together (albeit virtually) from all over the globe and tries to put the power back into the hands of the people? That is what is going down in the Wine 2.0 movement; the view of what is considered quality wine is shifting from the hands of a few influential critics, and into the masses. Don’t miss out – we just might be onto something special here.

There you have it. Enough positivity to rescue from the depression of my previous post. Come on in – the water’s (or is it the vino’s?) fine

Cheers!

(images: gapingvoid.com, suzylamplugh.org, biziki.com, preston.gov.uk )

Three Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Be a Wine Blogger

Vinted on July 11, 2008 under best of, commentary, wine blogging

So… you wanna be a wine blogger, eh? [ Editor's note: sorry, did not mean to sound Canadian there...].

Well, I’m here to tell ya NOT to do it.

Now, before you flame me with nasty e-mails and comments, please bear in mind that I will be following up this post next week with three reasons why you should be a wine blogger. But I can’t in good conscience do that before I tell you what you’re really up against if you want to wine blog.

Any type of blogging worth its salt is going to require genuine commitment from you. It will also require that your writing not totally stink. But these are not the reasons why you should think twice (or thrice, or… uhm… whatever comes after thrice) about starting up a wine blog.

Let me clue you in on the real scoop of wine blogging – the gritty reality behind the glitz, the glamor, the fortune, the fame…


1) There is no glitz, fortune or fame in wine blogging.
Sorry to have to break this to ya, but there’s no glitz, glamor, fortune or fame when it comes to wine blogging. You will NOT be quitting your day job. You will NOT be raking in the bucks from ad revenue. You will NOT be interviewed on CNN to expound on your wine smarties. Blogging revenue is usually tied directly to traffic. Who gets the most traffic in the on-line world? Social networks, porn, and productivity blogs (basically in that order). Wine blogging is NOT in the top three. It’s probably not even in the top 300 – and it probably never will be.

2) Two’s company, Three’s a crowd, and 600 is a Wine Blogging Community.
Guess what? You’re not the only wine blogger out there. You are in very good company. According to Alder at Vinography.com (arguably the granddaddy of all wine blogging), there are now over 600 wine bloggers. At least 200 of those are in the U.S. alone. It’s not just a crowded field – it’s a REALLY crowded field. And all of those bloggers are competing in some way, shape, or form for a similar reader pool as you. Doh! Even better – most of them probably know all the tricks of the trade in blogging to maximize their search engine karma, technorati authority, google page rank, etc., etc., etc. Double Doh! Which leads me to our next reason not to wine blog…

What you get out of wine blogging will depend primarily on what you put into it. In that sense, it’s a relationship between you and your blogging.

3) You need to be original from day one.
To wine blog, you need to offer something original to the community of 600+ and their potential readers. This will NOT be easy to do in a field of 600+ and their potential readers. In fact, it will be really, really, really difficult. And you won’t have much time to do it, either. Potential readers will decide in a matter of seconds whether or not your blog is worth reading ever again. They can do this because if they don’t like yours they can very quickly try another one of the 600+. Standing out is essential, and it’s not easy to do. Have fun!

It may not seem like it from the timbre of this post, but personally I don’t think that any of the above should stop you from wine blogging if you’re really passionate about it. What you get out of wine blogging (or any blogging, for that matter) will depend primarily on what you put into it. In that sense, it’s a relationship between you and your blogging.

More on that next week. In the meantime, have a safe and wine-filled weekend.

Cheers!

(images: interfacelift.com, workfarce.files.wordpress.com, aquariumdrunkard.com)

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